The Poker Floorman

A Floorman's perspective of the poker world

Poker Chips in Full View and Asking for a Chip Count

Keep your poker chips in full view; players can ask for a chip count

Poker players have a right to know how exactly how much money other players have in play on the poker table and they may ask the other players or dealer to count down their chip stack for an accurate count. (This is very different than asking how much is in the pot).  In general, larger chip denominations should be stacked in front of smaller chips so players can easily see them and they aren’t hidden behind smaller chips.   When you’re playing poker online each players chip total is displayed at all times and easily visible.  Not so in Brick & Mortar casinos.

I had to make a floor call in the poker room one day that ended up in a heated argument.  Player A (I’ll call her Jill) was heads up against Player B (I’ll call him Mike).  Jill was in Seat 3 and Mike was in Seat 8 and they were playing a 1/2 100 spread limit game.

Jill couldn’t see Mike’s chip stack from her seat so she asked Mike how much he had left when she was contemplating her bet size.  Mike took his right hand and held up the three $5 chips he was holding.  Jill then said, “OK, I’ll bet $15”.  Then Mike lifted his left arm, which was resting on the table, and he had another $50 or so in chips hidden behind his arm.  He was pretty proud of himself for fooling Jill, but Jill was not amused and asked for the Floorman to make a ruling.

After hearing the details, I ruled that Jill can take back her $15 bet and adjust her bet size if she wished to do so based on the fact that Mike was not honest about how much money he had on the table and Jill had the RIGHT to know exactly how much he had.  Jill then pushed out a $100 bet which was more than Mike had on the table.  Mike was furious with me, but he wasn’t honest and I feel that I made a ruling that was fair and in the best interest of the game.

February 26, 2011 Posted by | For Beginner Poker Players, Going from Online to B&M Poker, Poker Rules, The WTF Files | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

News & Info for Poker Rooms in Black Hawk, CO: 2.23.11

Here’s the latest News & Info for Black Hawk, Colorado Poker as of February 23, 2011

To stay up to date with the current poker happenings in Black Hawk subscribe by email or RSS on the right.

 


Latest News

New Lodge Poker Room promotion starting in March:  “The Friday 2 Fitty” (see below)

The Lodge will extend the WSOP promotion until June.

Golden Gates hit a Bad Beat this week.  Their $500 “Monthly Throw Down” tournament is this Saturday at 7:00

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17 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 30/60 HK, 1/2-100 SL, 2/5-100 SL, 4/8 HK daily, 10/20 and (sometimes) 6/12 on weekends.

Tournaments: None

Bad Beat Jackpot: $350,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Any Quads beaten, both hole cards need to play

Promotions: None

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: None



14 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 1/2-100 SL daily, 10/20 and 4/8 on weekends

Tournaments:
$65 “Breakfast Tournament”  – 10:00am daily.  Free breakfast buffet with entry
$60 buy in – 12:00pm, 3:00pm and 7:00pm every day

Bad Beat Jackpot: $400,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Any Quads beaten, both hole cards need to play

Promotions: “Friday 2 Fitty” starts in March.  Each hour from 1:00pm to 10:00pm, each table will deal a 5 card hand face up on the table.  Then the table with the best hand deals each player at that table a 5 card hand face up.  The player with the best hand gets $250.

Comps: $2 per hour, $4 per hour for VIP players

Special Events: WSOP 2011 Satellite Qualifiers run daily @ 12:00, 3:00 and 7:00, $60 buy in


18 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 1/2-100 SL, 4/8 and O8 sometimes
Tournaments:
“Sunrise Tournament” – 10:00am daily,  $40 buy in Monday through Thursday, $60 buy in Friday, Saturday & Sunday
Daily Tournaments – buy ins vary, 12:00pm, 3:00pm and 7:00pm
“Monthly Throw Down” $500 buy in – February 26 at 3:00pm
Charity Poker Tournament for Children’s Hospital – $100 buy in, February 27th at Noon

Bad Beat Jackpot: $65,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Aces Full of Kings

Promotions: None

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: “Hartland Poker Tour”, April 1st – April 10th

6 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 1/2-10 SL, 1/2-100 SL

Tournaments:
Monday through Friday – $40 buy in at 7:00pm
Saturday – $40 buy in at 1:00pm,  $60 buy in at 5:00pm
Sunday – $60 buy in at 2:00pm and 6:00pm

Bad Beat Jackpot: $80,363
Bad Beat Qualifier: Aces full of Kings (qualifier decreases each Monday if the Bad Beat Jackpot isn’t hit and the backup is $52,500 or more)

Promotions: Progressive cash drawings at 3:00pm, 6:00pm, 9:00pm, 11:00pm & 1:00am

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: None

(Central City)
3 Poker Tables
Games typically running: “Old School” Colorado 2/5 SL almost exclusively (1/2-10 SL on rare occasions)

Tournaments: None

Bad Beat Jackpot: $20,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: “Quad of the Day”
This is a bit different.  If the “quad of the day” is made, then another hand that day that beats the “quad of the day” activates the Bad Beat.  For example:  if it’s Monday, the “Quad of the Day” is 8888.  If someone gets quad eights, then someone else hits a better hand at any time that day, the Bad Beat gets awarded.

Here are the “Quads of the Day”
Monday: 8888, Tuesday: 9999, Wednesday: TTTT, Thursday: JJJJ, Friday: QQQQ, Saturday: KKKK, Sunday: AAAA

Promotions: Monday through Thursday: play 2 hours and receive $5 in comp

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: None

February 23, 2011 Posted by | News & Info for Black Hawk Poker, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Poker Betting Lines

Poker Betting Lines:  What do they mean?

More and more poker tables these days have a “betting line” (aka: racetrack, betting circle, action line or courtesy line) drawn on them.  It’s an oval drawn on the felt maybe 8-12 inches in from the rail or outer edge of the table.  It’s important for new poker players to realize what these betting lines mean since they can mean very different things in different poker rooms.

A typical “betting line”

In some poker rooms the betting line is a definite boundary that will have concrete consequences if chips or cards cross the line.  In these rooms, if you place chips or even hold chips out in the air beyond the betting line, every chip that crosses that line is committed to the pot.  Similarly, if your cards cross that line they are considered dead and your hand is gone.  There is no room for error here.  If you accidentally toss your cards beyond the line for any reason, you cannot get them back and your hand is dead.

In other poker rooms the line is merely a “courtesy line” where chips and folded cards are to be placed beyond the line so that dealers can reach them.  The line does not kill a hand or commit chips to the pot.  For example, a player could bring out a stack of 20 chips beyond the line and cut off 5 chips to make a bet, then bring the rest of his chips back.  Obviously this is very different from the “concrete” betting line where all 20 chips would be committed to the pot.  Also, if a player mistakenly thinks that all other players have folded and he tosses his cards forward, he can get those cards back if they aren’t buried in the muck first.  Again, this is very different from the “concrete” betting line where those cards would be considered dead.

So the moral of the story here is that new poker players or even experienced players playing in an unfamiliar poker room should ask the Floor Supervisor what the betting lines mean in that room to protect himself before sitting down in a game.

What about poker rooms that have no betting line drawn on the table at all.  How do you know when a bet has been made, a hand folded, etc.?

In many of these rooms the area beyond your hole cards is considered the “betting area” and any chips that go beyond your hole cards are in the pot, just as if they were brought out past an actual “betting  line” drawn on the table.  In other poker rooms, simply a “forward motion” with chips in your hand is considered a bet and is a judgment call.  The same goes for hole cards that are discarded.  Tossing them in a forward motion toward the dealer or the muck pile may be considered a fold.

It’s important to know the specific house rules of the poker room that you are playing in.  Don’t feel intimidated about asking questions about these things when you are in an unfamiliar poker room.  A good Poker Floorman will welcome these questions and be glad to answer them.  It’s better for him and you if he educates you about their specific house rules before you sit down to play than having to render a decision later that may not go your way because you didn’t know the house rule.

February 20, 2011 Posted by | For Beginner Poker Players, Going from Online to B&M Poker, Poker Rules | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

News & Info for Poker Rooms in Black Hawk, CO: 2.18.11

Here’s the latest News & Info for Black Hawk, Colorado Poker as of February 18, 2011

To stay up to date with the current poker happenings in Black Hawk subscribe by email or RSS on the right.

 


Latest News

The Isle of Capri Poker Room is scheduled to open on April 12th, 2011

Lady Luck’s Bad Beat Jackpot was hit.  Their Bad Beat Jackpot is now $79,000 and the qualifier has reset to Aces Full of Kings.  The qualifier decreases each Monday if the Bad Beat is not hit.

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17 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 30/60 HK, 1/2-100 SL, 2/5-100 SL, 4/8 HK daily, 10/20 and (sometimes) 6/12 on weekends.

Tournaments: None

Bad Beat Jackpot: $325,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Any Quads beaten, both hole cards need to play

Promotions: None

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: None



14 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 1/2-100 SL daily, 10/20 and 4/8 on weekends

Tournaments:
$65 “Breakfast Tournament”  – 10:00am daily.  Free breakfast buffet with entry
$60 buy in – 12:00pm, 3:00pm and 7:00pm every day

Bad Beat Jackpot: $400,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Any Quads beaten, both hole cards need to play

Promotions: None

Comps: $2 per hour, $4 per hour for VIP players

Special Events: WSOP 2011 Satellites run daily @ 12:00, 3:00 and 7:00


18 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 1/2-100 SL, 4/8 and O8 sometimes
Tournaments:
“Sunrise Tournament” – 10:00am daily,  $40 buy in Monday through Thursday, $60 buy in Friday, Saturday & Sunday
Daily Tournaments – buy ins vary, 12:00pm, 3:00pm and 7:00pm
“Monthly Throw Down” $500 buy in – February 26 at 3:00pm

Bad Beat Jackpot: $65,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Aces Full of Kings

Promotions: None

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: “Hartland Poker Tour”, April 1st – April 10th

6 Poker Tables
Games typically running: 1/2-10 SL, 1/2-100 SL

Tournaments:
Monday through Friday – $40 buy in at 7:00pm
Saturday – $40 buy in at 1:00pm,  $60 buy in at 5:00pm
Sunday – $60 buy in at 2:00pm and 6:00pm

Bad Beat Jackpot: $79,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: Aces full of Kings (qualifier decreases each Monday if the Bad Beat Jackpot isn’t hit)

Promotions: Progressive cash drawings at 3:00pm, 6:00pm, 9:00pm, 11:00pm & 1:00am

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: None

(Central City)
3 Poker Tables
Games typically running: “Old School” Colorado 2/5 SL almost exclusively (1/2-10 SL on rare occasions)

Tournaments: None

Bad Beat Jackpot: $20,000
Bad Beat Qualifier: “Quad of the Day”
This is a bit different.  If the “quad of the day” is made, then another hand that day that beats the “quad of the day” activates the Bad Beat.  For example:  if it’s Monday, the “Quad of the Day” is 8888.  If someone gets quad eights, then someone else hits a better hand at any time that day, the Bad Beat gets awarded.

Here are the “Quads of the Day”
Monday: 8888, Tuesday: 9999, Wednesday: TTTT, Thursday: JJJJ, Friday: QQQQ, Saturday: KKKK, Sunday: AAAA

Promotions: Monday through Thursday: play 2 hours and receive $5 in comp

Comps: $1 per hour

Special Events: None

February 18, 2011 Posted by | News & Info for Black Hawk Poker, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Poker Floorman Decisions Made “In the Best Interest of the Game”

Poker floor calls should be made “in the best interest of the game”

This may be hard for some poker players to swallow.  Sometimes, following the “letter of the law” rule is not the correct decision if an unfair outcome is the result.  That’s right, sometimes a good Floorman will “bend” the rules to promote what’s “in the best interest of the game” and to ensure a fair outcome.  Some poker players feel that being “fair” is nonsense and that a rule is a rule and should be enforced regardless of the circumstances.  This view itself is nonsense, especially when a player intentionally uses a rule as a weapon for his own disingenuous advantage.

There are times when common sense comes into play and, to be fair, the Poker Floorman needs to make a decision that may not completely conform exactly to a specific poker rule.  There’s usually a sign on the wall of a poker room that has something written on it like “The Floormans decision is final”.  This is one of the reasons for that sign.

Here’s a simple example (in my opinion):
It’s heads up on the river and Player A bets $100.
Player B deliberately counts out $100 in chips, holds them out at arms length as if to call and says “OK man…show me your flush.”
Player A then tables his hand, and he has a flush.
Player B then says, “I thought so.  But I didn’t call – I never released my chips into the pot”, then he withdraws his chips and folds.

So, should Player B be made to call the bet?  If I was called to the poker table my answer would be firm “YES” and here’s why.

I’ve written about “protecting your hand” and “protecting your action” and they are very important concepts for a poker player.  Player A really should have waited for Player B to release his chips into the pot to protect himself.  However, what Player B did is what we call an “angle shot” or “shooting an angle”.  He was deliberately trying to deceive Player A for his own advantage in an unethical and unfair way.  He induced Player A into showing his hand by implying that he called.   If Player B saw that he actually beat Player A, he would certainly have made the call, but he saw that he lost and claimed that he didn’t call.  It’s obvious to everyone involved that he shot and angle here.  Angle shots should not be tolerated or encouraged.

Some poker players feel that all is fair at the poker table and if a player doesn’t know the rules, that’s too bad for him.  To a certain extent this is true, but deliberately deceiving someone and manipulating the rules to your own advantage is unethical.

Sometimes deceiving your opponent is just fine – we’ve all bluffed a time or two.  But “angle shooting” and trying to get an opponent to fold or reveal his cards prematurely is despicable and should be discouraged.  The best hand should win at a legitimate showdown, or if all other players fold their hand.  In the case of the example above, I would do what is in the “best interest of the game” and insist that Player B call.

There are countless examples of “angle shooting”.  Poker players who follow the principles of protecting your hand and protecting your action will avoid most angle shots.  Protect yourself and good luck!

February 18, 2011 Posted by | For Beginner Poker Players, Going from Online to B&M Poker, Poker Rules | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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